Cordoba city is a day trip away from home in Jaén province but it is occasionally an overnighter too. The Casco Historico is the best known, most visited part of Cordoba and the part I know pretty well.  If you’re heading there by car it can be a nightmare of pedestrian area but there’s lots of on-street free parking on the other side of the bridge from the Mezquita, and well worth checking out.

Crossing from this side makes a great start to a visit, walk across the Roman bridge that straddles the River Guadalquivir. Although called the ‘Roman bridge’ w today what we can see is mainly an Islamic re-construction built on the ruins of the 1st century Roman Bridge.

As you pass over this huge 247 metre long bridge into historical Cordoba you get your first glimpse of the incredible Mezquita in front and the Royal Fortress or  its full name – Alcazar de los Reyes Cristianos (Castle of the Christian Monarchs) to your left. Both are these are absolute must visits. The Mezquita, the enormous Islamic Mosque has a huge orange-tree-filled courtyard and a minaret tower and an enormous prayer hall. If it is possible plan to go near opening hours or the end of the day to its appreciate its size and splendor in almost solitude and silence.

The Alcazar has beautiful Moorish design gardens and lots of Roman mosaics from the Plaza de la Corredera. Adjacent to the fortress in the Royal Stables where Andalusian horse shows are regular features. Do try and see one if you can, I am no horse lover, rather more afraid of them to get close but the shows are incredible displays of human interaction with the beasts and thoroughly enjoyable.

 

 

Cordoba-Patios

Cordoba-Patios

Cordoba Patios

For plant lovers the Cordoba Patios or Courtyard Competition at the beginning of May is the time to go. A glorious riot of colours in private patios which open to the public for the competition so it´s a great, if busy,  time to visit. The style and designs of these unique patios are stunning, even my flower-ignorant, non-plant lover hubby enjoyed it. I only took him once, too many times would be pushing it! Some of these historical patios give a glimpse into the past, with tiny patios, wells, communal wash rooms it’s easy to imagine people sitting out in the cool of the night singing and dancing flamenco. In recent years some of the patios have opened over Christmas and New Year too.

 

Another great visit for plaza and patios is the Palacio de Marquises de Viana or  just Palacio de Viana Palace a gorgeous house/museum dating from the 14th century. There are twelve unique patios ranging from Roman and Arabic to Renaissance styles and the museum is really interesting too.

One of my favourite stopping spots, if the weather is fine, is the amazingly large Plaza de la Corredera which  can only be seen on foot or possibly by Segway. I did a Segway tour (great fun when you learn how to stop) and a sightseeing bus tour which we took once with aching feet when we just did not want to walk anymore! I recommend both but enjoyed the segway tour more. Zipping (more like clinging on)  we went through the narrow streets (only just avoiding tourists) and saw interesting plazas and buildings which we then revisited  a bit more leisurely on foot afterwards. It’s a great way of having an overview of the city and getting your bearings.

Plaza-de-la-Corredera

Plaza-de-la-Corredera

Where to Stay in Cordoba

With such a choice of hotel in Cordoba it’s difficult to know where to start, but I’ve got three great suggestions for you – Hotel Balcon de CordobaLas Casas de la Juderia and Hotel Viento 10 all lovely hotels and close to the historical centre which is where you´ll probably spend all your time and wish you had longer.

 

On Fri, 12 Mar 2021 at 16:47, Rachel Webb <rachel.martos@gmail.com> wrote:

Cordoba city is a day trip away from home in Jaén province but it is occasionally an overnighter too. The Casco Historico is the best known, most visited part of Cordoba and the part I know pretty well.  If you’re heading there by car it can be a nightmare of pedestrian area but there’s lots of on-street free parking on the other side of the bridge from the Mezquita, and well worth checking out.

Crossing from this side makes a great start to a visit, walk across the Roman bridge that straddles the River Guadalquivir. Although called the ‘Roman bridge’ w today what we can see is mainly an Islamic re-construction built on the ruins of the 1st century Roman Bridge.

As you pass over this huge 247 metre long bridge into historical Cordoba you get your first glimpse of the incredible Mezquita in front and the Royal Fortress or  its full name – Alcazar de los Reyes Cristianos (Castle of the Christian Monarchs) to your left. Both are these are absolute must visits. The Mezquita, the enormous Islamic Mosque has a huge orange-tree-filled courtyard and a minaret tower and an enormous prayer hall. If it is possible plan to go near opening hours or the end of the day to its appreciate its size and splendor in almost solitude and silence.

The Alcazar has beautiful Moorish design gardens and lots of Roman mosaics from the Plaza de la Corredera. Adjacent to the fortress in the Royal Stables where Andalusian horse shows are regular features. Do try and see one if you can, I am no horse lover, rather more afraid of them to get close but the shows are incredible displays of human interaction with the beasts and thoroughly enjoyable.

Cordoba Patios

For plant lovers the Cordoba Patios or Courtyard Competition at the beginning of May is the time to go. A glorious riot of colours in private patios which open to the public for the competition so it´s a great, if busy,  time to visit. The style and designs of these unique patios are stunning, even my flower-ignorant, non-plant lover hubby enjoyed it. I only took him once, too many times would be pushing it! Some of these historical patios give a glimpse into the past, with tiny patios, wells, communal wash rooms it’s easy to imagine people sitting out in the cool of the night singing and dancing flamenco. In recent years some of the patios have opened over Christmas and New Year too.

 

Another great visit for plaza and patios is the Palacio de Marquises de Viana or  just Palacio de Viana Palace a gorgeous house/museum dating from the 14th century. There are twelve unique patios ranging from Roman and Arabic to Renaissance styles and the museum is really interesting too.

One of my favourite stopping spots, if the weather is fine, is the amazingly large Plaza de la Corredera which  can only be seen on foot or possibly by Segway. I did a Segway tour (great fun when you learn how to stop) and a sightseeing bus tour which we took once with aching feet when we just did not want to walk anymore! I recommend both but enjoyed the segway tour more. Zipping (more like clinging on)  we went through the narrow streets (only just avoiding tourists) and saw interesting plazas and buildings which we then revisted  a bit more leisurely on foot afterwards. It’s a great way of having an overview of the city and getting your bearings.

Where to Stay in Cordoba

With such a choice of hotel in Cordoba it’s difficult to know where to start, but I’ve got three great suggestions for you – Hotel Balcon de Cordoba, Las Casas de la Juderia and Hotel Viento 10 all lovely hotels and close to the historical centre which is where you´ll probably spend all your time and wish you had longer.