MalDia The main corridor of the magnificent Grandmasters Palace

The main corridor of the magnificent Grandmasters Palace

ALBERT FENECH

 

e/mail – salina46af@gmail.com

 

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/jerome.fenech

 

My Blog: https://myreachingout.wixsite.com/myblog.

MalDia The Ggantija Prehistoric Temple in Gozo

The Ggantija Prehistoric Temple in Gozo

Malta’s first ventures into tourism back in the 1960s were based on its prehistoric sites and antiquities, loads of sunshine and a focal point of return for British servicemen who had been stationed in Malta wanting to return with their families to revive and relive old memories.

MalDia Fort St Elmo

Fort St Elmo

These underwent gradual modifications over the years, mainly that of sites and antiquities gaining more importance as people worldwide became better informed and being attracted by internet sites relating Malta’s history.

MalDia The National War Museum with British uniforms on display

The National War Museum with British uniforms on display

The lure of sunshine and almost guaranteed fine weather remained too while the lure of attracting a holiday return of British servicemen began to dwindle and dwindle after Malta’s Independence in 1964 – although British tourism still remains as Malta’s main staple.

MalDia The inner courtyard of the Grandmasters Palace in Valletta

The inner courtyard of the Grandmasters Palace in Valletta

The steady buildup of tourist visitors over the years encouraged wholesale development with hotels mushrooming everywhere and the islands gradually transforming themselves into a fun and leisure spot in the blueness of the Mediterranean Sea with loads of marine hobby and leisure facilities available.

MalDia St Pauls Catacombs at Rabat

St Pauls Catacombs at Rabat

The advent of Mediterranean cruise liners becoming more available and more popular, using the Valletta Grand Harbour as a port of call has paid tremendous dividends, Passengers are given a whirlwind tour of Malta and return to ship determined to make Malta as one of their future tourist holidays. An increasing number of annual pop concerts are also paying rich dividends.

MalDia The prehistoric stone temple at Hagar Qim which means Sacred Stones

The prehistoric stone temple at Hagar Qim which means Sacred Stones

Language too has also been a bonus dividend with the spread of schools teaching English to non-British students. Most Maltese are bilingual in Maltese and English and trilingual in the added use of Italian. Communication is therefore easy and effortless.

MalDia The Hypogeum at Tarxien

The Hypogeum at Tarxien

However, above all, Malta’s lengthy and ancient history, including the prehistoric still proves to be an enormous lure and there was recently much satisfaction through certificates of recognition.

MalDia When this was excavated skeletons were found piled on each other

When this was excavated skeletons were found piled on each other

A number of Heritage Malta sites and museums have now been awarded by TripAdvisor and TripExpert following the positive responses received from worldwide comments about the Agency’s attractions.

MalDia The National Archaeology Museum

The National Archaeology Museum

A number of major sites have all received a Certificate of Excellence from TripAdvisor and the Experts’ Choice Award 2019 from TripExpert and TripExpert’s Best of Malta Award.

 

These are:

 

  • Fort St Elmo
  • The National War Museum
  • The National Archaeology Museum
  • The Grandmasters’ Palace
  • St Paul’s Catacombs
  • The Hypogeum at Ħal Saflieni
  • The prehistoric temples at Ħaġar Qim, Mnajdra and Ġgantija

 

Each of these has a history and heritage in its own rights. The Catacombs and Hypogeum were underground burial places. When the Hypogeum was discovered, 7,000 skeletons were found crammed in all the nooks and crevices.

MalDia The underground extinct river cave at Ghar Dalam

The underground extinct river cave at Ghar Dalam

The prehistoric temples are the oldest free-standing temples in the world, were run by the pagan “priests” at the time, offered human and animal sacrifices and were positioned to venerate solar worship.

MalDia The National Archaeology Museum

The National Archaeology Museum

In addition, Fort St Angelo and the Mitħna ta’ Kola (Kola’s Windmill – in Gozo) received a Certificate of Excellence from TripAdvisor, while the sites at Għar Dalam (an underground extinct river cave which positively proves that Malta was once joined to the African continent because of the type of animal skeletons found there), the Tarxien Temples and the Inquisitor’s Palace received the Experts’ Choice Award 2019 and TripExpert’s Best of Malta Award.

MalDia The Ta Kola Windmill in Gozo

The Ta Kola Windmill in Gozo

The Certificate of Excellence awarded by TripAdvisor is in recognition of consistently good service. This award was received by about 10% of all the entities that are featured in TripAdvisor for receiving consistently positive results over a number of years.

MalDia The Mnajdra Prehistoric Temples

The Mnajdra Prehistoric Temples

Now in its fourth year, the Experts’ Choice recognises the comments of well-known publications as travel guides, reviews and newspapers. This year’s awards were based on the responses of 1.5 million professional travellers. Less than 2% of attractions worldwide received this award.

MalDia The Inquizitors Palace at Vittoriosa

The Inquizitors Palace at Vittoriosa

Three attractions – the Ħaġar Qim Temple, the St Paul’s Catacombs and the National Archaeology Museum – were also honoured by TripAdvisor with a Certificate of Excellence – Hall of Fame, which certificate is awarded to attractions that have achieved this Certificate for five successive years.

 

With political stability, a healthy economy and the ease of air and sea travel as well as the attracting of tourists from further-flung destinations such as the United States, Japan, and China continue to make Malta a steadily growing market and a highly important contributant to Malta’s economy and employment market.

 

On the other side of the coin, the Maltese, already seasoned travelers down through the ages, are increasingly taking many, many more overseas tourist holidays with cruises from the Grand Harbour high in the popularity list and further distanced destinations like Vietnam, China, India, Bali, Thailand and Malaysia becoming more and more popular as well as Australia and Canada to visit and stay with relatives.

__________________                     __________________

MALTESE SAYING

“The devil has no milk”

An expression of exasperation; things are already not looking good and then something happens to make matters even worse and this is because of the evil of devilry because the devil has no milk of human kindness that can help things get better and the devil’s intervention makes them even worse.

_________________               _______________