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India votes!

As I go for my evening walks, I notice lots of banners and promotional content displayed with smiling photos of political candidates representing their respective parties. The newspapers and television channels too are full of political news and ‘spicy’ statistics, thus predicting the results of the 2019 National Elections of India. Mumbaikars will cast their votes on 29th April’ 2019 and I am all set and looking forward to choose the right candidate who I think will make a positive difference to my area and will best represent my constituency in the nation’s Lok Sabha.

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Mangoes announcing the arrival of summer! Photo courtesy: Aditya Chichkar

In India, economic, regional, communal and territorial biases are huge parameters when it comes to casting a vote in favour of a candidate. But I believe its different in Mumbai. Since Mumbai is a ‘melting pot’ of migrants from all over the country and people of all socio-economic backgrounds co-exists here, such biases seem to be less functional, especially among the educated masses of Mumbai.

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London-like look’ of Mumbai! Elphinstone College (Right) & Oriental Buildings in South Mumbai. Photo edited by Aditya Chichkar.

Mumbai’s cosmopolitan culture is a striking feature of its identity. A simple ‘Hello’ can be heard in various languages, as neighbours bump into each other after their morning walk. The newspapers tucked on every main door may be in English, Marathi, Gujarati, or any one of the 22 official regional languages of India! Over the years, people of various ethnic backgrounds have migrated here for their ‘pursuit of happiness’.

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Silent witness to Mumbai’s growth- Bombay Cotton Mill & Estate. Remains of a cotton mill at Cotton Green (Central Mumbai) Photo courtesy: Aditya Chichkar.

During one of my recent evening walks, I had a wonderful epiphany of how seeds sown by someone else in the past, can create opportunities for many in the present. It so happened that a mango fell on my shoulder when I passed a mango tree, which I had always admired since childhood. The tree is believed to have been there since a century.  As I relished the mango, I felt lucky to be the beneficiary of the mango tree that gave me an opportunity to be happy and thankful to the person who must have planted it ages ago.  As I further reflected, like millions of Mumbai’kars, I could see myself reaping the fruits, whose seeds were sown in Mumbai’s glorious past.

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Mural depicting Bombay’s maritime activities during the nineteen century- Lion Gate, Fort. Photo Courtesy: Aditya Chichkar.

It is not only the geographical advantage, of being a natural harbour, but also the role of pioneering institutions and visionary people (both of Indian and non-Indian origins), who led the city into its present-day image of being a ‘land of unlimited opportunities’.

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Old photograph of Grant Medical College & J.J Hospital, Byculla.

The British rulers of Bombay were the first to sow the seeds of urbanization & progress. Most of the Governors of the ‘British East Indian Company’ wanted to give a ‘London like’ make-over to the city. They acted on their words and with modern infrastructural set ups of those times, ‘the Company’, and later the British Crown, transformed Bombay from a laid-back hamlet into a buzzing hub of educational and commercial importance. Though I am a passionate Nationalist, I acknowledge the progressive work done by the British administrators for creating ‘Modern India’. Though the colonist had their vested interest in bringing on the changes, yet what’s worth acknowledging is that the logistics, infrastructure & systematic approach that was adopted in administering the changes, was of high qualitative standards, which I wish our today’s politicians refer while they set their execution standards. Here’s a clip of pre-Independence Mumbai (Bombay): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v2jkslEEX6A.

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Old look of G.T Hospital (up) & St. George Hospital, CST. Photo edited by Aditya Chichkar

The Grant Medical College, named after the then Governor of Bombay, & Sir J.J Group of Hospitals was established in 1845. Through these institutions, it was for the first time Western medicinal approaches were taught and practiced in India. Today so many of us must have been treated by the doctors who graduated from Grant Medical College and who may have practiced in J.J Hospitals. Sir. Jamsethji Jeejiboy, a generous Parsi Philanthropist donated huge sums of money to start four hospitals, namely J.J Hospital, Byculla, St. George Hospital, Fort, G.T. Hospital and Cama & Albless Hospital, CST. These institutions are still operational and are committed to public service.

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My alma mater, University of Mumbai.

An intellectual renaissance was brought about in and around Bombay by the establishment of the University of Bombay. Founded in 1857 by Dr. John Wilson, the university’s administrative model was designed by Sir Charles Wood. Initially the Elphinstone College building, served as the campus for the university, but soon the university got its own campus where the present day Rajabai clock tower stands in South Mumbai. The clock tower, which houses the university library, was designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott on the lines of London’s Big Ben clock tower. A Gujrati businessman donated money for constructing it which was named after his mother- Rajabai.

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Dr. Waldemar Haffkine and the ‘Haffkine flask’, specially designed by him while developing the anti-plague medicine. Photo edited by Aditya Chichkar.

A well-known author Peter Singer quotes, “Hebrew word for charity ‘tzedakah’, simply means “justice” and as this suggests, for Jews, it is no optional extra but an essential part of living a just life.”   David Sassoon, a Bagdadi Jew truly implemented this quote into practice when he migrated to Bombay along with this family in the early part of the 19th century. Originally a banker, he later invested in the cotton, opium and real estate market of Bombay. Since 1832, he procured huge profits from his business ventures, but at the same time also believed in achieving a full circle by positively giving back to the society. He donated huge sums of money to various institutions in Bombay namely, Magen David Synagogue, Victoria Gardens (Raani Baag zoo), Masina Hospital, Byculla, The Bank of India, Fort, to name a few. Besides this, he funded the David Sassoon Library and Reading Room, located at Kala Ghoda, Fort. The library was first referred as the Mechanic’s Institution in 1847, were European employees of Bombay’s Government Mint and Dockyard use to visit for seeking technical education.  A recent restoration of the library has added glamour to the heritage ambience that the library offers to its patrons.

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Dr. Haffkine’s effort to save the people of Bombay during the plague epidemic of 1896-97. Photo edited by Aditya Chichkar.

Bombay’s migrant population increased in the second half of the 19th century. Cotton mills had sprung everywhere in the city. People from the nearby Konkan area flocked to the city in search of employment as mill workers. Their families soon joined them and gradually the city needed better sanitation and hygiene facilities. Crisis struck when Bombay was hit with the bubonic plague in 1896-97. But Dr. Waldemar.Haffkine rose to the occasion and developed an anti-plague vaccine that literally saved 50% of Bombay’s population from succumbing to the deadly disease. Dr. Haffkine was a Russian Jew who was passionate about the science of bacteriology. He, along with the Imam (Religious head) of Ismaili Muslim community, His Highness the Aga Khan III, showed immense courage by testing the anti-plague vaccine on themselves first, purely with an intention for public welfare!

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His Highness Sir Sultan Mohammed Aga Khan III, the 48th Imam of the Nizari Ismaili community who supported Dr. Haffkine and offered him his Khushru Palace at Mazgaon to set up a laboratory.

The Plague Laboratory in Bombay, where Dr. Haffkine worked for the British Government, was later renamed as the ‘Haffkine Institute’ in 1925. Inspite of the risk and challenge involved in tackling the plague crisis, Dr Haffkine quotes, “the work at Bombay absorbed the best years of my life…”! My visit to the Haffkine Institute at Parel (Central Mumbai) invoked in me deep admiration for Dr. Haffkine, who challenged his own limits to save the citizens of Bombay during the plague epidemic.  The Haffkine Institute Museum, is a must see for all who love to know the field of bacteriology, medicine and techniques of developing various vaccines. For more information: http://www.haffkineinstitute.org/

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Asiatic Society & Central Library that houses the marble statue of Jaggannath ‘Nana’ Shankershet, a man with a ‘golden heart’! Photo edited by Aditya Chichkar.

The modern cosmopolitan culture of Bombay is deeply rooted in the city’s DNA. Along with the British, many members from the the Parsi, Jew, Muslim, Hindu, particularly from the Gujrati & Marathi communities have build the city from scratch.

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My alma mater, University of Mumbai.

Before Mumbai votes, they need to remember the work of Jaggannath ‘Nana’ Shankershet, who was an elite Marathi businessman, philanthropist, social reformer and a revolutionary educationist dedicated who his time and wealth to build Bombay’s culture and character. Born in 1903, he generously donated land and money for building schools, theatre and a crematorium. His benevolence earned him equal respect from all sections of the society namely, the British, native elites and the working class of Bombay. He was the first Indian to be nominated to the Legislative Council of Bombay and was also the first Indian member of the Asiatic Society of Bombay. He along with a fellow visionary, Dr. Bhau Daji Lad, championed the cause of women’s education, inspite of fierce opposition from the orthodox communities of those times.

Having visited the institutions that have been touched by people like Dr. Haffkine, David Sasson, Jameshedji Jeejiboy and Jagganath ‘Nana’ Shankershet, was nothing less than a pilgrimage.

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Mumbai’s heritage at its best! Illuminated exteriors of David Sassoon Library and Reading Room, Kala Ghoda. Photo courtesy: Aditya Chichkar.

I am a third generation Mumbai’kar and I see myself reaping the seeds of goodness planted by these empowered and noble people from the bygone era, who nurtured a sense of ownership towards the city & indirectly towards the Nation. A thought I always ponder on is that ‘When India was not free, we were led by great visionaries who genuinely made a difference by their leadership. But now when India is free & is the largest democratic country in the world, then why are we failing as a nation to vote for good politicians & administrators who will make a positive difference?’ With the election fever all around, I wish and hope that the politicians that we select make a positive difference by their work. With reference from the philanthropical & social work of people who contributed in laying the foundations of Mumbai, I believe, the conscientious and sincere politicians from the ‘pool of political market’, can surely take reference and execute their roles. Usually we blame the politicians for not doing their work well, but we forget that its ‘We the people of India’ who choose them as our leaders in the first place. So, I urge my fellow Mumbaikars to choose only those candidates who will positively sow the ‘seeds of public welfare’, so that we and our future generation both, reap the benefits of our political choices of today! Happy Voting!

 

Photo Courtesy: Shraddha. C. Sankulkar and free internet resource.