Hastings Dormouse

We have a very special little creature in care at the moment. An amazing hazel dormouse. Over the last few years we have started to see more and more of them coming into care. Sadly the majority of them come in after being caught by cats, but with antibiotics and care they frequently make a full recovery and get returned back to their home range.  However, the one we currently have was rescued in Hastings after being found trapped in a bucket. The poor little creature was very cold and lethargic.

A big congratulations to my other half and Casualty Manager Kathy Martyn who has now been volunteering at WRAS for just over 10 years. It was a birthday at the weekend so a huge thank you for all the hard work and dedicated time she has put in dealing with everything from tiny hatchling birds to huge stags.  One of the very first rescue Kathy attended with me was a deer with an injured leg out in the countryside between Buxted and Blackboys.  The deer had been cut free from some a fence but was struggling to run with a damaged leg. The deer stumbled through some undergrowth onto a wooden path. Kathy was one end and I was the other. The deer looked both ways and decided Kathy was the better option to try and get past.  Kathy found herself with a stag running in a rather awkward manner towards her and she ended up rugby tackling the deer to the ground. I was impressed to say the least!  We soon had the deer secure and on its way to St Tigglewinkles Wildlife Hospital for specialist veterinary help.

Hastings Dormouse

Kathy now heads our Pigeon and Dove care. She frequently has baby pigeons and doves at home having to crop feed them and treat them.  She also co-ordinates the over wintering of our hedgehogs and their release in the Spring.  In her garden at home she has a special shed which during the summer we nick name our “Hedgehog Maternity Suite”  as we put pregnant hedgehogs in there as well as mum who have had nest disturbed and are trying to look after newborn babies. We use this facility as it is quieter than our centre and less stressful for them. In the winter the shed becomes one of our over winter hibernation facilities.

Kathy work amazingly hard 7 days a week. I can’t remember the last time she didn’t have any casualties at home.  She looks after three of our aviary sites monitoring the casualties for fitness and suitability for release.  We rarely get a chance to go away or take time off because we always have casualties we are looking after. Its amazing having a partner like Kathy.

Burwash Tawny Owl

We have had a stunning Tawny Owl admitted just after 1am in the morning from Burwash. Found on the roadside the callers picked him up and called WRAS. On call rescuers from Eastbourne headed up to collect the owl and assess the bird for any injuries. Luckily the owl seemed to have got off lightly and was bedded down at our hospital.

We are getting a few very small hedgehogs being admitted at the moment. Last we had another young hog rescued from Seaview Road, Newhaven weighing just 135g. After he was spotted out during the day and too small to be by himself, he was picked up and kept safe till rescuers collected him. We have also had a couple of small hedgehogs rescued in North Way Seaford, plus in Romney Road and West Close Polegate.

Other calls this week have included a road casualty gull in St Leonards Road Eastbourne, an injured hedgehog in Romney Road Polegate and an injured white pigeon in Alciston. We also had a call to a Razorbill found wandering in the road at Leeside Wharf Eastbourne, the bird has been taken over to RSPCA Mallydams Wood for specialist care.

 

 

 

Trevor Weeks MBE

Founder & Operations Director

 

East Sussex Wildlife Rescue & Ambulance Service (WRAS)

Reg Charity 1108880

 

Office: 01825-873003

24Hr Rescue Line: 07815-078234

Trevor’s Private Mobile: 07931-523958

 

Address:

Unit 8 The Shaw Barn, Whitesmith, East Sussex, BN8 6JD.

 

 

 

About Trevor Weeks

Trevor Weeks MBE Operations Director for East Sussex Wildlife Rescue & Ambulance Service (WRAS) Trevor started undertaking wildlife rescue and conservation work in 1985 when just 13 years old, and his life has been dedicated to the care of wildlife ever since. East Sussex Wildlife Rescue was established as a voluntary group in 1996 and became a registered charity in 2005. WRAS now has four veterinary ambulances and a Casualty Care Centre on the A22 between Hailsham and Uckfield capable of looking after up to 200 casualties at a time. The charity is primarily run by volunteers and relies of donations to fund its award winning life saving service.