warm sweaters

warm sweaters

After last week’s little episode I decide a trip to Worthing and a little retail therapy was in order. Thankfully I had a lift to the town and a promise of lift home, so I was going to enjoy my expedition, something I have not done for a while. I was in desperate need of some warmer sweaters, but being too eager to buy them, I walked into the nearest shop and ended up with four bright new sweaters. As I paid for them I began to question impulsive decision. My plan had been to have a good look around the town at leisure, but how was I going to manage now with stick in one hand and a bag full of the sweaters in the other?
I must have looked preoccupied as the shop assistant, who had been extremely helpful bringing sweaters from the top or bottom shelves to eye level so that I didn’t need to bend, must have read my mind. You look as though you could do with a coffee, she said ‘Why don’t to leave your package with me and have a little wander around and treat yourself to a coffee and cake? Their package will be safe with me.’

coffee and cake

coffee and cake

I could have flung my arms around her, but instead I thanked sweetly and said I would be back in about an hour or so. My mind had plans for me to rush around browsing from store to store, but my body was set on a different course. Two shops in that coffee, cake and a rest seemed like a very good idea. Again I was greeted with nothing but overwhelming kindness. Although this was a self-service cafe, the assistant told me to find a seat and she would bring my coffee and cake to me. Being fiercely independent and not one for accepting help easily I found my feeling quite emotional. Did I really look that decrepit and I wanted to shout I am not THAT old you know! Instead I graciously accepted the kindness from a total stranger.

Liverpool-Terrace

Liverpool-Terrace

Energised I decide I still had half a hour to spare so walked along to Liverpool Terrace in the centre of Worthing and sat in the little garden watching everyone else rushing by. It was cold but sunny and it made me feel spring was only just around the corner.

-Desert-Sculptures-Liverpool-Gardens

-Desert-Sculptures-Liverpool-Gardens

I love living in Worthing, it is a town full of superb Victorian, Georgian and Victorian architecture, with lots of little secrets, and every time I visit I find something of interest. For example, Liverpool Terrace and the gardens are named after Lord Liverpool, Britain’s longest serving Prime Minister (1812-1827). It was designed by Henry Cotton, and looked out onto a pleasure garden, where the residents could play bowls or archery and there was even an impressive gateway from Montague Street, but sadly by 1911 the gardens were overgrow, dogs were fouling the garden and it looked in a sad state. By the 1930’s most of the houses, once owned by the rich had been converted into flats and a fire in 1935 only added to the decline. Then in 1937 the Council stepped in and purchased the gardens in an attempt to improve the area, and by October 1949 the whole terrace was listed as being of historical interest and the ‘Liverpool Terrace Association’ restored it to its former glory. It was agreed that the terrace should be painted in ‘country cream,’ which has remained to this day
Just across from the garden overlooking the Terrace are the ‘Frink Heads’ as they are known locally.

The-Desert-Quartet-by-Dame-Elizabeth-Frink

The-Desert-Quartet-by-Dame-Elizabeth-Frink

The Desert Quartet, as they are official known are the creation of Dame Elizabeth Frink (1920-1993) who with Henry Moore and Barbara Hepworth is considered to be one of the greatest British sculptors of the 20th century. They were completed in 1989 and so called because they were inspired by her feelings whilst
on a visit to the Tunisian desert.close up of one of the desert quartet These were not the first designs put forward to the Council by the sculptor, which included a frieze depicting animals and a naked running man, but rejected by the Council and being in bad taste and possibly
offence. Some claim these rather dour heads were Dame Elizabeth’s response to the strong objects to her original design. They were unveiled on 13 June 1990, and each head measures 4ft high set on 7 ft pedestals, and their name derives from a visit Dame Elizabeth made to Tunisia. Love them or hate, they are interesting and
give my plenty of food for thought.
Liverpool Terrace Worthing

About Wendy Hughes

Wendy turned to writing, in 1989, when ill-health and poor vision forced her into early medical retirement. Since then she has published 26 nonfiction books, and over 2000 articles. Her work has appeared in magazines as diverse as The Lady, Funeral Service Journal, On the Road, 3rd Stone, Celtic Connections, Best of British, and Guiding magazine. She has a column in an America/Welsh newspaper for ex-pats on old traditions and customs in Wales. Her books include many on her native Wales, Anglesey Past and Present, The Story of Brecknock, Brecon, a pictorial History of the Town, Carmarthen, a History and Celebration and Tales of Old Glamorgan, and a book on Walton on Thames in the Images of England series, a company history and two books on the charity Hope Romania. She has also co-authored two story/activity books for children. Her latest books are: Haunted Worthing published in October 2010, a new colour edition of The Story of Pembrokeshire published in March 2011, and Shipwrecks of Sussex in June 2011 and Not a Guide to Worthing in 2014. She is working on a book entitled A-Z of Curious Sussex which will be published in 2016 Wendy also works with clients to bring their work up to publishable standard and is currently working on an autobiography with a lady that was married to a very famous 1940’s travel writer. Wendy has spent many years campaigning and writing on behalf of people affected by Stickler Syndrome, a progressive genetic connective tissue disorder from which she herself suffers. She founded the Stickler Syndrome Support Group and raises awareness of the condition amongst the medical profession, and produces the group’s literature, and has written the only book on the condition, Stickler The Elusive Syndrome, and has also contributed to a DVD on the condition, Stickler syndrome: Learning the Facts. She has also writing three novels, Sanctimonious Sin, a three generation saga set in Wales at the turn of the century, Power That Heal set in the Neolithic period entitled Powers that Heal, and a semi biographical book entitled New Beginnings which deals with two generations coping with blindness and a genetic condition. She has also had a handful of short stories published, and in her spare time is working on several at the moment. She also gives talks on a variety of subjects including Writing and Placing Articles, Writing Local History, Writing as Therapy, Writing your first novel, etc, and runs workshops on the craft of writing – both fiction and non-fiction. She is a member of the Society of Women Writers and Journalists, and a member of the Society of Authors.