Kathy Martyn with the Road Casualty Deer from Nutley (1)

Kathy Martyn with the Road Casualty Deer from Nutley (1)

Thank you so much to everyone who has sent in cards, notes and donations to our Casualty Centre to show support for our volunteers and staff. They have all gone on display in our volunteer room for everyone to read.  Over £1000 in donation has come in too which is fantastic.  So on behalf of all our volunteers thank you very much.  Rescuers have spent yet another week working very long hours to help the wildlife of Sussex.

Kathy and I were called out to a road casualty young deer on Crowborough Road, Nutley just before 1am on Thursday morning. The chocolate coloured young fallow was on the grass verge when we arrived being looked after by passing motorists. We checked the young deer over at the side of the road and assessed her for broken bones and spinal injuries before moving her into the back of WRAS’s ambulance and down to WRAS’s Casualty Centre at Whitesmith.

Kathy Martyn with the Road Casualty Deer from Nutley (2)

Kathy Martyn with the Road Casualty Deer from Nutley (2)

Casualty Managers Katie Nunn-Nash and Chris Riddington were already at the centre, when the deer arrived,  after having spent the evening admitting a tiny catted mouse, a gull with a large fishing hook in its neck, a young pigeon from Newhaven, a RTA fox which rescuer Kai had been to in Newhaven.  They had also been out to rescue four baby hedgehogs from Observatory view Hailsham and a badly injured gull at Eastbourne pier plus a duck in Eastbourne walking along the middle of the road.

After the deer’s wounds were cleaned, sutured and emergency medication given she was bedded down. I agreed to stayed in the pen all night with her to monitor her condition and to keep her alive. Every hour I tubed her 60ml of rehydration fluid and helped keep her safe and comfortable.  Chris re-joined me at 7am allowing me to take a break and sort myself out before transporting her up to deer experts Chris and Sylvia Collinson at Chelwood Gate after  9am. The prognosis is guarded due to the head injury. By the following evening she was standing but very concussed and disorientated.

Trevor stays over night with the Nutley deer

Trevor stays over night with the Nutley deer

We have also been to Ditchling Common lake again after calls about the cygnets being caught in fishing line. We have had to remove the two remaining cygnets but whilst we were there we found the remaining lone parent dead in the water.  X-rays showed the body to have been shot with two air gun pellets embedded in her body, along with a fishing hook and a recently broken in wing.  WRAS has contacted Sussex Police and the County Council about the incident asking for action to be taken to improve the management of the site.  There is blatant disregard for the notices asking dog walkers to keep dogs under control. Several visitors to the park last week mentioned to us that they had seen a dog attack the parent, which might have been the cause of the damaged wing.   Visitor often encourage their dogs to jump into the water and chase the water fowl.  As for the fishing line and hooks, the management of the site is very much in need of improvement, if the site does not improve then fishing should be banned all together.

We have had a road casualty Buzzard in this week. It was picked up by a passing motorist on Monday morning from the A22 near Uckfield. The Buzzard was very concussed and treated at WRAS’s Casualty Centre. The bird made a very quick recovery and was suitable for release the following day back close to where found. You can see a video of the release along with various other videos on our You Tube Channel at https://youtu.be/VoUtKKBGSEo.

Kathy has been very busy this week with numerous baby pigeons being admitted. We are getting quite a few calls from people thinking they have found ducklings and when we arrive we find them to be yellow fluffy baby pigeons.

Many of the cards and notes received at WRAS

Many of the cards and notes received at WRAS

Tuesday night rescuers had to split into two teams due to the amount of calls coming in. Rescuers Katie and Mitch have been to Newhaven dealing with a gull hit by a car and a pigeon trapped in a building, then on to Seaford to deal with a hedgehog with suspected ring worm. Chris and Daryl have been dealing with a poor gull that has been stuck between a shed and a fence with wounds on its wings and a road casualty gull with a severely fractured leg and wing which sadly had to be put to sleep.

 

 

Trevor Weeks MBE

Founder & Operations Director

East Sussex Wildlife Rescue & Ambulance Service (WRAS)

Reg Charity 1108880

Reg Address: 8 Stour Close, Stone Cross, BN24 5QU

Hospital Address: Unit 8 The Shaw Barn, Whitesmith, Lewes, BN8 6JD

24hr Rescue Line: 07815-078234

Private Mobile: 07931-523958

Welcome

An award winning community charity.

IFAW Animal Action Award Winners 2010

ITV1 British Animal Honours Awards Local Charity of the Year 2013

BBC Radio Sussex & Surrey Community Heroes Award for Animal Welfare 2012

 

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About Trevor Weeks

Trevor Weeks MBE Operations Director for East Sussex Wildlife Rescue & Ambulance Service (WRAS) Trevor started undertaking wildlife rescue and conservation work in 1985 when just 13 years old, and his life has been dedicated to the care of wildlife ever since. East Sussex Wildlife Rescue was established as a voluntary group in 1996 and became a registered charity in 2005. WRAS now has four veterinary ambulances and a Casualty Care Centre on the A22 between Hailsham and Uckfield capable of looking after up to 200 casualties at a time. The charity is primarily run by volunteers and relies of donations to fund its award winning life saving service.