peoples-market-lampeter-687 Lampeter is a busy market town that still retains many independent shops despite the arrival of two supermarkets. Wander along the high street and you’ll find Conti’s, an ice cream parlour that still operates from the same shop it started life in back in 1946 and at the other end of the town is Lloyds, a fish and chip shop that started in 1949. There is a mix of craft shops, vintage shops, boutiques hardware stores as well as the usual chemists, butchers, florists and bakeries.

On the second and fourth Saturday of the month the People’s Market is held at the Victoria Hall. It will be on this Saturday 26 April from 10 am to 1 pm. I will definitely be pottering a long this week as there is a plant swap taking place, courtesy of the Permaculture Group. This is a great idea where you can bring vegetable and fruit plants to swap, or make a small donation. The idea behind the People’s market is to encourage Lampeter to become a thriving Market Town once more where local people cater for the majority of local needs for food, products, skills and services. peoples-market-lampeter-700I think this is a fantastic aim and one that more towns should adopt. Whilst it may take some time for Peoples Market to achieve all of its goals, it is undoubtedly a fantastic community project and what strikes you when walking around this market is the great atmosphere and lively buzz. There is always a band playing live at the market and this undoubtedly adds to atmosphere as well as showcasing home-grown talent.

There is an excellent selection of local produce including artisan bread, cakes, lovely fresh vegetables, wonderful local cheeses and even locally grown shitake mushrooms. peoples-market-lampeter-672There is also a lovely selection of craft stalls that cover everything from glass painting, knitting and crochet to spinning. If you fancy a potter and then a little relax you might want to take advantage of the book swap and then sit down with a pot of tea in the Coastal Café. They serve mean cheese toasties and apparently the bacon butties are a real morning treat, but the charm of the Coastal Café is not in what they serve, but the purposefulness behind the Coastal Café project which is a facility to train and give experience of the work place to those with disabilities.

If you ever find yourself in West Wales on a Saturday the Peoples Market is defiantly worth taking a look at and you will undoubtedly find yourself coming out laden with wonderful local Welsh produce.

About Seren Charrington-Hollins

ABOUT SEREN-CHARRINGTON-HOLLINS Describing my work through just one job title is difficult; because my professional life sees me wear a few hats: Food Historian, period cook, broadcaster, writer and consultant. I have a great passion for social and food history and in addition to researching food history and trends I have also acted as a consultant on domestic life and changes throughout history for a number of International Companies. In addition to being regularly aired on radio stations; I have made a number of television appearances on everything from Sky News through to ITV’s Country House Sunday, Holiday of a Lifetime with Len Goodman , BBC4’s Castle’s Under Siege, BBC South Ration Book Britain; Pubs that Built Britain with Hairy Bikers and BBC 2’s Inside the Factory. Amongst other publications my work has been featured in Period Living Magazine, Telegraph, Daily Telegraph, Daily Mail and Great British Food Magazine and I write regularly for a variety of print and online publications. I am very fortunate to be able to undertake work that is also my passion and never tire of researching; recreating historical recipes and researching changing domestic patterns. Feel free to visit my blog, www.serenitykitchen.com