The Valletta to Sliema route

The Valletta to Sliema route

In January this year Transport Malta received almost 1,500 applications for motorcycle licences, 500 more than in January 2015. A budget measure has enabled those holding a B Driving Licence to qualify for a motorcycle licence as long as the capacity is under 125cc and as long as they follow a monitored ten-hour training course.

 

The downside is that with the enormous amount of vehicle traffic, frustrating jams and hot Mediterranean tempers, a motorcycle can become a most deadly machine and so far this year there have already been two horrendous deaths.

Arriva's disastrous bendy buses.

Arriva’s disastrous bendy buses.

Vehicles and vehicle licences run into hundreds of thousands and it is estimated that onstream over 50 new vehicles a month add to the swell. Malta is a small island; motorways do not make sense and do not exist; in many areas roads have been long-built at a time when horse and carriage were the transport of the day. James and delays are inevitable.

 

However, it is stark to think that during a morning rush-hour it takes me as long to travel by bus the few kilometres from my home in Qawra to Valletta as long as it would take me to fly from Malta to Rome!

 Each bus had a name or a motto!

Each bus had a name or a motto!

The answer of course is an efficient and well-oiled public transport system encouraging people to travel by bus and leave their vehicles at home. Sadly, this is easier said than done. Malta’s public transport system has always had a chequered history and was thrown into further confusion some six years ago when the Government decided to scrap the old bus system and let the company Arriva take over.

 

The result was pretty disastrous and the ultimate result was people deciding that public transport had become a non-starter and one perforce had to use one’s vehicle.

MalDia 02 (23-03-16) New fleet of buses for Malta Public Transport. Situation has improved.

A form of cheap public bus transport was introduced in Malta in the early 1920s when the enterprising entrepreneur Joe Gasan introduced a few buses. Gasan was a well-known businessman who had secured the Ford franchise for Malta and Gozo at a time when automobiles were becoming a rage.

 

There was however a great problem. Illiteracy was rampant and numeracy extremely limited. Only the “privileged classes” could make head or tail of exhibited bus routes, destinations and bus numbers. Then, they had a brilliant idea.

The old colourful system of bone-shakers, the Valletta to Mellieha route

The old colourful system of bone-shakers, the Valletta to Mellieha route

Colour codes were the answer. Thus, routes and destinations were defined and a colour attached to the applicable route, a system immediately espoused by the public and a system that endured generation after generation.

 

Most of the engines were Ford and Dodge and the chassis built and painted in Malta.

 

Valletta was the central hub with two terminals. The pea green colour bus was the Sliema route via Floriana, Msida and Gzira, and back; the light blue and white stripe bus went all the way to Mellieha via Birkirkara, Mosta and St Paul’s Bay; the bright red bus to Birkirkara via Hamrun, and so on and so forth with some really colourful combinations.

The Valletta to Rabat route.

The Valletta to Rabat route.

And that was that and things went swimmingly for decades.

 

However, a few drawbacks began to develop. The colour of bus tied it down to one route although a lick of paint could easily change that. A licence system was developed to cover the various routes and a bus-owner had to have a licence for a particular route.

 

The more profitable the route, the more expensive the licence and in time licence owners could re-sell their route to other owners and a whole trading racket developed.

Fares were strictly controlled by the Government so the shady dealings in licences did not concern the public. Times were prompt and regular although as recently as the 1970s the last buses made their final day’s journey by leaving the Valletta terminal at 9pm.

 

The system worked well so if it’s not broke, why fix it?

 

In 1971 Malta elected a new Prime Minister and Domenic Mintoff set about making sweeping changes. He pronounced the colour system as “degrading” and reminiscent of “colonial days” when illiteracy was rampant.

 The Valletta to Birzebbugia and Kalafrana route.

The Valletta to Birzebbugia and Kalafrana route.

As from henceforth all buses had to have one colour, a light pea green and were to show numbers, routes and destinations. Later they became yellow and orange in an effort to re-introduce the panorama of colour.

 

Over the next 20 years industrial litigation became frequent mainly concerning fares, still controlled by the Government but opposed by bus owners alarmed at rising costs. Consequently the service and the condition of buses rapidly deteriorated with many rattling bone-shakers still operating.

The Valletta to Zurrieq route.

The Valletta to Zurrieq route.

Unfortunately too, the occupation of being a “bus driver” was looked down upon as being the only outlet for the uncouth and for ruffians – and many drivers brought this on themselves. I can well remember being on a bus where the driver suddenly stopped and decided to cool off with a beer from a nearby bar or maybe wanted a takeaway sandwich. Public conveniences also made for unofficial bus stops!

 

All this caused aggravation and was also a source of merriment mainly for tourists experiencing a ride in these ramshackle contraptions. The driver’s booth was decorated with plastic curtains and plastic flowers and there were always effigies and pictures of Jesus and the Madonna, somewhat contrasting to the frequent rudeness and blasphemous oaths of the drivers. A few buses with a/c were later introduced but more often than not the system did not operate. Drivers also frequently short-changed tourists

The Valletta to Lija route.

The Valletta to Lija route.

Every bus had a nickname emblazoned on the external front, with names like “Roy Rogers”, “Elvis Presley” and “Life in Heaven”. Every bus too had internal slogans like “God Help Us” and the ever-popular “Verbum Dei Caro Factum Est” (and the Word of God was made Man).

 

Finally, the situation became intolerable and some six years ago the Malta Government swept it all away and introduced an Arriva national bus service which turned out to be a total flop. The Arriva Management must bear some of the blame, but they were horrendously misled by local sources.

The old colour code allocated for Gozo.

The old colour code allocated for Gozo.

The Arriva “bendy-buses” were a disaster in Malta’s narrow and heavily congested roads; the routes were badly designed and time schedules were hay-wire. Arriva raised a lot of expectations as to how they would “revolutionise” the service but this failed miserably.

 

Over two years ago Arriva called it a day after bendy-buses were banned and after substantial financial losses were incurred. The Malta Government’s Malta Transport Authority bought the buses and ran the system for a short while before handing over to a Spanish transport company which now runs the system.

One of the two old Valletta terminals at Kastilja in front of the Prime Minister's Office.

One of the two old Valletta terminals at Kastilja in front of the Prime Minister’s Office.

For a while total disgruntlement continued but gradually improvements have begun to kick in as the new company purchased more new buses, consulted the public on frequencies and route changes and increased the number of drivers, albeit recruiting from overseas so the driving corps has virtually become multicultural.

 

One cannot say that everything is running like clockwork but the improvements are visible and the disgruntlement has declined. However, it will still take some time for a trotally efficient system and hopefully a decrease of the numbers of vehicles on roads.

Commemorative postcard.

Commemorative postcard.

Most unfortunately, many of the inefficiencies are not under the public transport company’s control. Garbage trucks block roads; delivery trucks block roads stopping in mid-road to make deliveries to retail outlets and warehouses; vehicle drivers themselves tend to be uncaring and erratic and everybody is ready to have a go at everybody else.

A driver's decorated cabin in the old bone-shakers.

A driver’s decorated cabin in the old bone-shakers.

Still, this IS the Mediterranean I suppose.

 

 

ALBERT FENECH

 Mintoff's one-colour re-shuffle.

Mintoff’s one-colour re-shuffle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About Albert Fenech

Born in 1946, Albert Fenech’s family took up UK residence in 1954 where he spent his boyhood and youth before temporarily returning to Malta between 1957 and 1959 and then coming back to Malta permanently in 1965. He spent eight years as a full-time journalist with “The Times of Malta” before taking up a career in HR Management but still retained his roots by actively pursuing freelance journalism and broadcasting for various media outlets covering social issues, current affairs, sports and travel.