Native yellow bottle brush. Taken by Reginald J. Dunkley

Native yellow bottle brush. Taken by Reginald J. Dunkley

Patricia Newell-Dunkley   Photographs by Reginald J. Dunkley.

G’day from down under where heatwave conditions reign for the October long weekend, the beaches are full and there is football fever with the grand finals of the Australian Football League and the National Rugby League all being played. Hawthorn beat the West Coast Eagles winning three Premierships in a row, while North Queensland Cowboys outgun the Brisbane Broncos to win Premiership 17-16.

The Wallabies have qualified for the World Cup quarter-finals and eliminated one of their main rivals for the title with a dramatic 33 – 13 win over England at Twickenham. Lifting Australia to the Top Pool A, ahead of Wales on points difference. Twitter has gone into overdrive following England’s elimination as Prince Harry watched England get knocked out.

From June to November Mother Nature takes over in Western Australia and it is blanketed with wild flowers. There are more than 12,000 species making it the world’s largest collection. It is a staggering sight to behold, especially when you consider 60% of Western Australia’s wild flowers are found nowhere else on earth. Glorious carpets of colour and curious blooms for six months of the year. Starting in the north of the state and finishing with a flurry on the south coast. You can enjoy a picnic on a blanket of white, pink and yellow everlastings or seek out the unique blue leschenaultia in the Coral Coast or golden outback, go hunting for delicate orchids in the south west. Alternatively you can view the very best of all Western Australia’s wildflowers every September and October in Perth at Kings Park Botanical Gardens, coloured banksias to vivid red and green kangaroo paws are all found in National Parks. In the North West you will find vibrant floral shades with dusty red earth and golden Spinifex grass.

natures design by Reg J.Dunkley

natures design by Reg J.Dunkley

Lesueur National Park is one of the top hotspots with more than 900 varieties, while Coalseam Conservation Park has never-ending carpets of pink, gold, cream and white everlastings, with a diversity of wildlife including kangaroos, emus, echidnas, eagles, cockatoos, for the nature lover this is truly paradise. Whilst at Coalseam Park you can explore the site of Western Australia’s first coal mine, and view fossilised marine life in the riverbanks and take a walk along a trail. Kalbarri National Park is one of the most popular places to visit with grevilleas to feather flowers and an abundance of bird life. You can go bushwalking, gorge hiking or canoeing and journey back 400 million years, when the tidal flats of an ancient sea formed the striking red sandstone and the Murchison River carved out deep gorges on its way to the ocean.

Mount Augustus is the world’s largest monolith, twice the size of Uluru and is an awesome sight. At sunrise and sunset the colours change from cool greens and blues to golden glows. Ancient rock art and mysterious caves of the Wadjari, Aboriginal people who call the landmark ‘Burringurrah’ for thousands of years, the rocks natural springs have been a source of water. Gum trees, wattle and native trees and shrubs are a haven for wildlife with purple flowers predominating. Fitzgerald River National Park, Stirling Range near Albany is home to one of Western Australia’s highest peaks Bluff Knoll. Then there is Karijini National Park where Fortescue Falls run all through the year at Dales Gorge Waterfalls.

Pretty red wildflower taken by Reginald J. Dunkley

Pretty red wildflower taken by Reginald J. Dunkley

Outback wildflower trails lead you through some the of the State’s most breathtaking displays. There is also a goldfields wildflower trail from Perth to Kalgoorie-Boulder, en route, you will be treated to ever-changing landscapes of historic gold rush towns, eucalypt woodlands and vast sand plains, contrasting with spectacular displays of spring wildflowers. Whatever you do make sure you take a camera and enter Australia’s Golden Outback competition, win $500 and share you images on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram Page.   Enjoy!

There was not a bull or a Spaniard in sight as 150 sheep barrelled down the Main Street of a country town in Southern New South Wales as part of an annual sheep stampede. Fifteen thousand visitors lined the small farming town of Boorowa 100 kilometres north of Canberra, for the annual “Running of the Sheep” spectacle as part of the popular event. Kelpies and a motorbike shepherded a flock of merino sheep 300 to 400 metres down the Main Street. The event is part of the Boorowa Irish Woolfest, a weekend celebrating the town’s history and the region’s renowned wool industry. A colourful street parade with a range of floats followed the run. Visitors were treated to the Australian Whip Cracking Championships, a Rodeo and Sheep Shearing.

Masked up and ready to go KISS is in Australia for their 40th Anniversary Spider tour. Front man Paul Stanley says the band made a career on breaking the rules, and don’t intend to stop breaking them any time soon. The legendary U.S. Rock Band will be supported by The Dead Daisies. A limited amount of V.I.P. packages were available which included Painted Facetime and Photo opportunity with the band have sold out immediately. The band has sold over 100 million albums. Wearing the Spaceman costume and Catman outfit, plus big boots, these monsters of rock are dressed to kill.   Touring Perth, Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Sydney, and Newcastle.

Shelly Beach is packed with visitors as the temperature soars, caravans and tents vying for the best positions on the coast.   The birds are in the garden enjoying their breakfast, including two Crimson headed Rosellas who seem to have discovered us on a permanent basis. My books “The Complete Guide to Painting and Decorating Porcelain, Letters of a Travelling Lady, and Wallis the Woman I love” are available on my website www.patriciasartworld.com and on Amazon.

Cheers.   Patricia.

Native orchid growing wild taken by Reginald J. Dunkley

Native orchid growing wild taken by Reginald J. Dunkley

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About Patricia Newell-Dunkley

I am an artist writer, born in Sussex, Shoreham-on-Sea and educated at Ealing Modern School in London. I studied amongst other subjects English Literature and Art which sowed the seeds for what would become a lifelong passion. It was not until 1970, after moving to Australia, that I began to satisfy my artistic desire when I first started Porcelain on-glaze painting using mineral oxides paint, a style which would become my forte. Within six months I had bought a kiln, and I embarked on an extensive series of courses over the following years in Grounding, Gold and Silver Gilding, Lustres, Raised Paste and Pen work. In 1980 I began to offer my art through a number of major Sydney outlets. Initially the Fine Art Department of the Myers City Store, followed by David Jones, Grace Brothers, The International Airport, Micawbers Antiques, Bourke’s Hilton Hotel, Roseville Gallery and Toowoon Bay Gallery. Over the years my painting styles have expanded to include Oil, Pastel, and Watercolours. I am a member of the Society of Authors and also a member of the Society of Women Writers and Journalists UK. My writing includes articles and poems published in This England, Evergreen, and The Radio ABC Pot Pourri of Poems, as well as short stories. “The Complete Guide to Painting and Decorating Porcelain,” “Wallis the Woman I Love,” a narrative poem, “Letters of a Travelling Lady,” and six romantic novels.