Hedgehog found in Ditchling‘Dixie’ the hedgehog was released back in Uckfield last night with her own welcoming committee from the neighbouring houses. Her life was saved a just over a week ago when she was heard scrabbling between a 6 foot high wooden fence and an equally high wall in no man’s land between 2 gardens backing on to each other. We still have no idea how she got there, as there were no gaps at the sides or underneath. She was dehydrated, had worn her claws down trying to get out and the fur off her nose was worn. The householders removed a fence panel to get to her. She was checked over, sampled and given a weeks B&B. She has put on a lot of weight, so much so, that we suspect she is pregnant.Dixie being released in Uckfield

Last weekend Kathy and I received a call just after midnight about a hedgehog with a damaged leg at Ditchling. We jumped out of bed and drove across to Ditchling to assess the poor creature’s injury. On the way we crossed Chailey Common and were greeted by a herd of horses in the road, who ambled across from one side of the common to the other, lovely to see them.  Driving then through Wiveslfield Green we had to stop for a young hedgehog crossing the road, Kathy jumped out and checked him over to make sure he was OK before releasing him in the hedge nearby.  When we arrived at Ditchling we were shown a video of the hedgehog walking with a clear problem. Kathy used her magic touch to help uncurl the hedgehog whilst I felt the leg. There were no open wounds, but a strange movement in the leg quite high up which I suspected could be a break. The hedgehog was given emergency medication and taken back home and was booked in to see the vet and have an x-ray.   On the way home as we were leaving Ditchling we had to slow down for another rather large hedgehog crossing the road.

A big thank you to staff at Eastbourne District General Hospital who were very helpful and supportive in allowing us to rescue a gull trapped under netting at the Hospital. Also thanks to everyone at Seaford Fire Station for helping to rescue a gull entangled in fishing line on top of a roof in Seaford too. Both birds were successfully rescued and released.

Firemen rescue gull in Seaford

Firemen rescue gull in Seaford

Thank you to Health Management at Ringmer who held a “Charity Dress Down Day” in aid of East Sussex WRAS and raised £800. Fantastic effort everyone. Much Appreciated.

Under a month to go until our Manager Lindsay is doing a parachute jump in aid of WRAS! She has never done this before so quite nervous but you can help give her the encouragement she needs by donating on her just giving page at www.justgiving.com/Lindsay-Redfern1

Everyone is very tired at WRAS at the moment. Chris and I have been out numerous times in the middle of the night on rescues. Kathy has been getting very little sleep looking after yet more very small baby pigeons. Lindsay, Kirsti and Nikki have been up with baby hedgehogs so we are all rather drained at the moment.

WRAS managers Lindsay and Chris attended reports of 6 ducklings trapped in a courtyard in Lewes. On arrival mum had returned to the ducklings, but they had now made their way close to the main road. Lindsay and the caller used a walk towards net to corner the mum and Chris managed to use a net to grab her. All the ducklings were quickly scooped up and placed next to her so she didn’t panic. On the way back to the ambulance Lindsay was stopped by a neighbour who also reported ducklings in her garden. After having a search they couldn’t be found and it was believed they had gone under some decking. Lindsay went and got the mum and ducklings out of the van and brought them into the garden in a carrier, the noise from the ducklings enticed the missing two ones to re-join their family. They were safely released nearby. This as well as other rescues and rescues can be seen on our You Tube Channel www.youtube.com/user/eastsussexwras

Rescuers Chris and Tony rushed to the Pevensey bypass after reports a fox had been hit by a car. Sadly the fox made its way in to the thorn bushes. The caller left a bottle to mark where it was last seen. Chris and Tony arrived and began walking up and down the bypass in a hope to see it. Tony spotted it and as they approached it went deeper into the bushes. Chris crawled on his hands and knees whilst Tony went around the other side to corner the fox. Chris eventually managed to scruff the fox and passed it to Tony, who carried it up the embankment back to the ambulance. Sadly the fox has quite a nasty shattered leg and major damage to the pelvis which was not repairable. He was rushed straight into the vets. Sadly no wildlife rescue service can run compassionately without having to put casualties to sleep. We always try to keep them to a minimum. But if injuries are not treatable or repairable then we have no choice but to euthanase a casualty, but we don’t put healthy and fit casualties to sleep as they are suitable for release back to the wild.

Gull trapped under netting at Eastbourne Hospital

Gull trapped under netting at Eastbourne Hospital

 

 

Trevor Weeks MBE

Founder & Operations Director

 

East Sussex Wildlife Rescue & Ambulance Service (WRAS)

Reg Charity 1108880

 

Reg Address: 8 Stour Close, Stone Cross, BN24 5QU

Hospital Address: Unit 8 The Shaw Barn, Whitesmith, Lewes, BN8 6JD

 

24hr Rescue Line: 07815-078234

Private Mobile: 07931-523958

 

http://www.wildlifeambulance.org/

 

An award winning community charity.

IFAW Animal Action Award Winners 2010

ITV1 British Animal Honours Awards Local Charity of the Year 2013

BBC Radio Sussex & Surrey Community Heroes Award for Animal Welfare 2012

 

About Trevor Weeks

Trevor Weeks MBE Operations Director for East Sussex Wildlife Rescue & Ambulance Service (WRAS) Trevor started undertaking wildlife rescue and conservation work in 1985 when just 13 years old, and his life has been dedicated to the care of wildlife ever since. East Sussex Wildlife Rescue was established as a voluntary group in 1996 and became a registered charity in 2005. WRAS now has four veterinary ambulances and a Casualty Care Centre on the A22 between Hailsham and Uckfield capable of looking after up to 200 casualties at a time. The charity is primarily run by volunteers and relies of donations to fund its award winning life saving service.