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This week I was overrun with animals and children. I had the pleasure of looking after my friend’s thirteen year old daughter for a few days and that combined with my three year old and five year old was a recipe for fun in itself. Amidst the chaotic fun and niggles I must confess that I found myself declaring that I was vacating my home in favour of a shed at the bottom the garden many times. I also made the promise of changing my name to something other than, ‘mummy’ or ‘Seren’ on a number of occasions. Perfume making experiments leading to burnt saucepans, nail varnish spillages, trying to catch the budgie with a tea towel, petty arguments and fussy eating aside we had some jolly nice times and of course the delights of borrowed teenagers are that you can send them home again. The downside of borrowed teenagers is that it gives you a sneak preview of things to come and for me the scary realisation that my eldest is only eight years away from turning into onejay,spics 038

In conjunction with my house being under teenage attack I had the delight of seven little chicks being hatched under the supervision of my two broody hens, Henrietta and Geraldine. My little girls, Hattie and Libby were delighted and they may well be the most photographed chicks in West Wales. The chicks are growing fast and it is lovely to see the proud hens looking after their brood, it’s especially lovely this year as the hens have hatched them naturally with me resisting the temptation of an egg incubator.

It seemed this week that I couldn’t get away from new life and nature as indeed even the simple task of stabling the pony resulted in the rescuing of a swallow and clearing out the garage ended in the discovery of a little field mouse nest in one of the boxes. Amidst exited cries to keep them as pets (which I ignored) I took a few snaps with my camera before placing the box back and leaving Mrs. Mouse and her family to it. I must confess they did look incredibly cute and I was smitten, but within minutes I was back to cursing the furry little rodents for their reign of terror on my garage contents and chewing activities.

Whilst the weather has been somewhat chaotic and at times it has been hard to accept that Summer is indeed with us, the new life surrounds me in the shape of chicks, tadpoles, mice and hatchlings is a clear indication that Summer has arrived.

My week was complete after finding the wonderful borrowed teenager with a new ‘pet’ mouse from the garage in my daughter’s bedroom. The chat about wild animals needing to be left in the wild fell on deaf ears as she announced the mouse was no longer wild and that his name was Marvin. Well as Marvin was returned to the wild she wailed, but thankfully she soon forgot about him and turned her attention to making concoctions the kitchen that would be suitable for a vampire to eat, indeed the world of teenagers is a strange one.

Well I shall be abandoning the delights of Wales this week as I head off to Scotland and sample some regional delights. I’ll be telling you all about that next week, so until then I bid you a fond farewell from an animal crackers corner of West Wales.

 

 

About Seren Charrington-Hollins

ABOUT SEREN-CHARRINGTON-HOLLINS Describing my work through just one job title is difficult; because my professional life sees me wear a few hats: Food Historian, period cook, broadcaster, writer and consultant. I have a great passion for social and food history and in addition to researching food history and trends I have also acted as a consultant on domestic life and changes throughout history for a number of International Companies. In addition to being regularly aired on radio stations; I have made a number of television appearances on everything from Sky News through to ITV’s Country House Sunday, Holiday of a Lifetime with Len Goodman , BBC4’s Castle’s Under Siege, BBC South Ration Book Britain; Pubs that Built Britain with Hairy Bikers and BBC 2’s Inside the Factory. Amongst other publications my work has been featured in Period Living Magazine, Telegraph, Daily Telegraph, Daily Mail and Great British Food Magazine and I write regularly for a variety of print and online publications. I am very fortunate to be able to undertake work that is also my passion and never tire of researching; recreating historical recipes and researching changing domestic patterns. Feel free to visit my blog, www.serenitykitchen.com