Wet Blue Tit found in A22 East Hoathly

Wet Blue Tit found in A22 East Hoathly

This has been the busiest week of the year so far. With rescuers struggling to stop for breaks they have been on the road almost constantly.

We’ve had two calls to bats this week. Rescuer Lindsay went to the aid of a Pipistrelle Bat in  Eastbourne. There are no obvious injuries but the bat is quite underweight.  We also had handed in a Brown Long Eared Bat found in Wellingham Lane Ringmer. Both were taken to Jenny Clark MBE at the Sussex Bat Hospital at Forest Row where they are now being looked after.  The Pipistrelle turned out to be pregnant too.  We were also lucky to see one of the rarest bats in the UK, a Grey Long Eared Bat which was rescued by WRAS several weeks ago at Jevington.

 

 

Badger from Heathfield

Badger from Heathfield

 

 

 

We’ve had a gosling with a nasty injury to its neck caused by a fishing hook and line. The poor creature was rescued on the lake at Roebuck Park Hellingly. Due to the extent of the injuries the gosling was taken up to the Swan Sanctuary for their specialist vets to assess.

Pipistrelle Bat found in Eastbourne

Pipistrelle Bat found in Eastbourne

In just one hour Thursday morning last week we had rescuer Sally dealing with an injured pigeon in Polegate, rescuer Tony dealing with a gull chick and young Jay in Polegate and a bird trapped in a chimney in Eastbourne. Plus rescuers Kathy, Chris and I dealing with an injured fox and Magpie in Buxted.

We have had yet more fox cub trauma cases this week, causing us problems with capacity. This mature fox cub has come into critical care tonight. WRAS rescuers were on the way to the centre with a casualty and came across this little one in the middle of the fast lane on the A22 near Hailsham. Rescuer Chris turned around to check on it to find it was still just about breathing. He picked the fox up and rushed him to the ambulance where they rang for advice from our emergency vet. He was seen straight away and he was rushed in to care. After a full examination and some medication, WRAS rescuers were allowed to take him back to the centre for rest.  The cub is suffering from head trauma and slightly weak on his legs, and disorientated.  The cub is responding to treatment and picking up so we hope he will make a full recovery.

Road Casualty Fox from Hailsham

Road Casualty Fox from Hailsham

The fox cub which Kathy and I dealt with at Buxted at the weekend was taken into Henley House Vets in Uckfield for assessment, there were several fractures but they were not fresh, and already starting to heal. Luckily fractures in young animals like this heal much quicker than adults, we will need to monitor this cub closely to ensure she makes a full recovery.

Tony rushed out to a badger at Heathfield at the weekend.  WRAS’S vet Mike was called to the centre to examine the badger at 11pm, due to the badgers injuries and a large swelling on her belly. After sedation the badger was found to have nasty, deep maggot infested bite wounds around her genitals and anus. There was also an abscess in her jaw and damaged teeth plus possible pyometra too. We had no choice but to end her suffering.

Tiny Baby Collared Dove

Tiny Baby Collared Dove

We are short on blankets, towels and pillow cases. If you have any please drop them off at our Casualty Centre at Unit 8 The Shaw Barn, A22, Whitesmith, BN8 6JD. Search for “East Sussex Wildlife Rescue & Ambulabce Service” on Google maps for directions. Unfortunately as our ambulances are so busy at this time of year we are unable to do collections.  There are two bins by our door where people can leave donated clean donations.

Kathy and I have been to rescue a nestling sparrow in Mallard Drive Uckfield. He has some cuts on him which have been treated and has now been bedded down with WRAS’S orphan team.  There is also a trio of robins have come in from Golden Cross. One came in early afternoon but was then  joined by these two siblings, after they were found on the driveway. All safe and sound now.

We are starting to get more starlings, finches and tits coming into care. Mainly where cat and dogs are picking them up and bringing them inside caller’s homes. One little starling was brought in by a cat who proudly showed his parents what he had caught. The starling however had other ideas and as soon as the cat turned his back he ran in the fireplace and hid. WRAS rescuers attended just after 11pm and filmed the little one hiding behind the fire. With some persuasion with a wooden spoon he made a bolt for it straight into our rescuers hands. He has now been bedded down at the centre and is being treated.  This little wet young blue tit was found in the middle of a busy A22 just after torrential rain last week, as I was driving to the centre. He was found tumbling from the wash of the traffic. I jumped out and waved down approaching cars and secured the bird in a carrier and had him quickly back to the centre.

Two baby robins

Two baby robins

Other calls have also included rescuers dealing with a fatally injured Gull in Eastbourne, a hedgehog that was out during the day also in Eastbourne, a mouse that had been catted in Westham, and a very small baby collared dove in Polegate,  also a hedgehog out during the day in Stone Cross to name just a few. Kathy and I also dealt with a road casualty Pheasant on the A22 Uckfield By-pass, which we were able to release after just 8 hours.

 

 

Trevor Weeks MBE

Founder & Operations Director

East Sussex Wildlife Rescue & Ambulance Service (WRAS)

Reg Charity 1108880

Reg Address: 8 Stour Close, Stone Cross, BN24 5QU

Hospital Address: Unit 8 The Shaw Barn, Whitesmith, Lewes, BN8 6JD

24hr Rescue Line: 07815-078234

Private Mobile: 07931-523958

http://www.wildlifeambulance.org/

An award winning community charity.

IFAW Animal Action Award Winners 2010

ITV1 British Animal Honours Awards Local Charity of the Year 2013

BBC Radio Sussex & Surrey Community Heroes Award for Animal Welfare 2012

 

About Trevor Weeks

Trevor Weeks MBE Operations Director for East Sussex Wildlife Rescue & Ambulance Service (WRAS) Trevor started undertaking wildlife rescue and conservation work in 1985 when just 13 years old, and his life has been dedicated to the care of wildlife ever since. East Sussex Wildlife Rescue was established as a voluntary group in 1996 and became a registered charity in 2005. WRAS now has four veterinary ambulances and a Casualty Care Centre on the A22 between Hailsham and Uckfield capable of looking after up to 200 casualties at a time. The charity is primarily run by volunteers and relies of donations to fund its award winning life saving service.