A Fledgeling Blackbird

A Fledgeling Blackbird

The number of hours we are working each week is increasing all the time. This week Chris and I have both worked approximately 146 hours between us, and this hasn’t included time on call between rescues!

Thursday was a very long day, with an early start at 5.30am arriving at our Casualty Centre. We have had a lone fox cub for the past few weeks from Bexhill which is too small to go with our group, so we had arranged for the cub to go up to another rescue centre with suitable sized cubs up in Essex. We were going to go during the day time but with a shortage of staff and volunteers meant we had to try and get back early. The journey up to Essex took about 90 minutes and the M25 was quite clear which is what we had hoped. By 8am we were at the Wildlife Hospital in Essex and the cub was being handed over.  After a quick stop for breakfast we were back on the road heading for Sussex again. We arrived back at Whitesmith just after 10am. The day was quite busy with numerous rescues and work to undertake generally around the centre. Then late afternoon a call came in about a Raven with a damaged wing. Due to the type of injury and the size of the bird we decided the bird was going to need more specialist help so the bird was taken down to Gloucestershire to Vale Wildlife Rescue.  We left at about 3pm and drove round the M25 up the M40 and then across past Oxford, which ended up being a terrible journey over 90 minutes longer than originally stated on the Sat Nav. We eventually arrived at Vale about 7.30pm. We stopped for a quick bite of dinner before heading back.  We decided to come back via the M5, cut across to the M4, M25 and M23, but even this proved problematic, with road closures and disappearing diversions at three locations along the route meaning Chris and I returned home about 2am!  Having worked a long 21 hour day, Chris and I still had to get up the following morning to be at the Casualty Centre for ward rounds and casualty checks!

Air filled Duckling from Horam

Air filled Duckling from Horam

Calls this week have been fairly varied including a rare Grey Long Eared bat and the more common Brown Long Eared bat in the Eastbourne area. We attended to pigeons in Eastbourne, Sovereign Harbour, Willingdon, Polegate, Hailsham, Uckfield, Seaford and Lewes.  We had a beautiful little Blue tit admitted to the centre from Uckfield. He had an injury to his leg after being caught by a cat in the morning. One of our ambulances also attended catted blackbirds in Bexhill, Hailsham, Eastbourne and Lewes. We’ve had a Magpie rescued in Polegate, a catted robin in Uckfield and a Wood pigeon from Haywards Heath. Kathy and I rushed out on Saturday night to check on a Tawny Owl hit by a taxi on the road to Fletching. Although we were on site within 15 minutes the owl was nowhere to be seen after a long search. Fingers crossed the owl recovered and flew off. We have also received calls from the RSPCA to attend a gull in Bexhill and another in Newhaven.

The strong winds last week caused us problems with a number of birds coming in after being blown out of trees. We had three young magpies come in to care after their nest was blown from a tree. Sadly 3 of their siblings died, but two are still going strong and loving being fed by the orphan rearing team.

Rescuers also dealt with 7 ducklings that had been abandoned by their mum at Eastbourne crematorium. Later the same day a second clutch of ducklings was discovered but luckily mum was found nearby.  We have also had a rather rounded duckling come in from Horam. The duckling is full of air and bloated. This is normally either an infection or a problem with an air way. He has been seen by our Vet Chris and is being made comfortable.

Blue Tit from Uckfield

Blue Tit from Uckfield

We have had yet more fox cubs this week. This year has seen us deal with a lot of sick and injured cubs, way more than normal. Tony rushed to a road casualty fox in Seaford at 5:30am on Thursday morning.  We had a fox cub with suspected poisoning which was admitted but sadly died. Another fox cub was rescued and rushed up to Henley House Vets in Uckfield. He was found in a back garden in Bexhill unresponsive and suffering from possible convulsions. We are sending a couple of the fox cubs off for post mortem examination.

We are still in need of people to join our baby bird feeding team! We are currently in need of helpers for the Monday & Friday morning shifts (7am-10am), Tuesday afternoon shift (10am-2pm) and Monday and Saturday evening shifts (6pm-10pm). The role will include feeding sick injured and orphaned baby birds ranging from tiny robins to tawny owls and crows. Feeding is required as often as every 20-30 minutes, and in the height of the season is almost constant, so you do need to be physically fit. Feeding and cleaning will require some bending and lifting also. If you are interested, please email Lindsay at lindsay@eastsussexwras.org.uk

We are also interested in people helping at our new reception, answering the phone, and helping keep our records up to date on the database. The role includes greeting people arriving at the centre and helping with our little educational area and merchandise.  We need  people to do about 9am till 2pm, about 1pm till 6pm or working all day between 9am and 6pm, working one day a week. If interested please e-mail trevor@eastsussexwras.org.uk.

 

Two baby magpies from Lewes

Two baby magpies from Lewes

 

Trevor Weeks MBE

Founder & Operations Director

East Sussex Wildlife Rescue & Ambulance Service (WRAS)

Reg Charity 1108880

Reg Address: 8 Stour Close, Stone Cross, BN24 5QU

Hospital Address: Unit 8 The Shaw Barn, Whitesmith, Lewes, BN8 6JD

24hr Rescue Line: 07815-078234

Private Mobile: 07931-523958

http://www.wildlifeambulance.org/

An award winning community charity.

IFAW Animal Action Award Winners 2010

ITV1 British Animal Honours Awards Local Charity of the Year 2013

BBC Radio Sussex & Surrey Community Heroes Award for Animal Welfare 2012

 

About Trevor Weeks

Trevor Weeks MBE Operations Director for East Sussex Wildlife Rescue & Ambulance Service (WRAS) Trevor started undertaking wildlife rescue and conservation work in 1985 when just 13 years old, and his life has been dedicated to the care of wildlife ever since. East Sussex Wildlife Rescue was established as a voluntary group in 1996 and became a registered charity in 2005. WRAS now has four veterinary ambulances and a Casualty Care Centre on the A22 between Hailsham and Uckfield capable of looking after up to 200 casualties at a time. The charity is primarily run by volunteers and relies of donations to fund its award winning life saving service.