11071744_926169550761282_482484836351979415_nWe had a call about an unusual wildlife casualty this week. It was a mole. We rarely see them in care and are quite specialist animals to look after. This little chap was found in a field in Polegate not wanting to move. Our colleagues from Folly Wildlife Rescue have very kindly taken him on from us.10245355_927218910656346_1075903176890172869_n

We’ve had a young gull rescued by Centre Manager Chris on his way into work. It was hit by a car on Upperton Road, Eastbourne. It was quickly rushed to our on-call vet. The gull had lost the use of its legs, but they are starting to regain movement and we hope with a bit of time the gull will make a full recovery. We also had an adult gull which we collected from St Annes Vets. He was also hit by a car in Eastbourne. He had some minor scrapes and grazes, but hopefully should do well. We’ve also had a couple of pigeons collected from St Annes Vets this week too.  Rescuer Amy has been out to St Leonards for a pigeon caught by a cat too.

Another lovely colourful visitor this week has been a gold crest rescued at a school in Firle Road Seaford with minor concussion. Luckily he had no injuries. After medication and 24 hours rest he was raring to go and so was test flown and then taken back for release.

11037666_926121047432799_7745980349116127522_o“Volvo” our fox which came into care from Cooden Beach after being caught in a fence by a rear leg, has now fully recovered and has been released back into the wild.  He has been in care for over 6 weeks now. All our vets Mike, Chris and Simon have been involved in caring for this fox in order to help the nasty leg wound recover.  After weeks of changing bandages, cleaning wounds, and medication WRAS’s Care Team and Feed & Clean Shift Volunteers have done an amazing job in saving this fox so that it could be returned back to the wild.

After last week’s Brighton Marina swan rescue we were able to return and catch the second of the injured swans. This one’s injuries were nowhere near as bad as the first swan so came into WRAS’s Casualty Centre for just 24 hours of care.  We were able to return this swan to his partner on the inner harbour the following day.  There is a video of the release of this swan on our You Tube Channel. The other swan which was more seriously injured has also been returned from the Swan Sanctuary too after 5 days of care to repair the wounds.11063924_925094887535415_9080551980331187035_o

We also had a Swan emergency in Eastbourne this week. We believed the swan to have crashed into a wire or overhead cable and crashed at the Gas Works off Finmere Road, Eastbourne. The swan was rushed up to our Casualty Centre where we cleaned and treated the wounds before being delivered up to the vets at the Swan Sanctuary.

We have also been out to two swans wandering along Marsden Road, Eastbourne. At first we thought they might me the adventurous swans from Langney Pond. They have been known to wander around the local housing estate, but they were still on their pond.  Our rescuers caught the swans on Marsden Road and delivered them up to WRAS for a check over. As it was getting late they were bedded down for the night and released at Princes Park the following morning.

 

 

 

The Buzzard which was rescued at Chailey last week has been released now back into the wild where found. A video of the release is at our You Tube Channel at www.youtube.com/user/eastsussexwras.

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About Trevor Weeks

Trevor Weeks MBE Operations Director for East Sussex Wildlife Rescue & Ambulance Service (WRAS) Trevor started undertaking wildlife rescue and conservation work in 1985 when just 13 years old, and his life has been dedicated to the care of wildlife ever since. East Sussex Wildlife Rescue was established as a voluntary group in 1996 and became a registered charity in 2005. WRAS now has four veterinary ambulances and a Casualty Care Centre on the A22 between Hailsham and Uckfield capable of looking after up to 200 casualties at a time. The charity is primarily run by volunteers and relies of donations to fund its award winning life saving service.