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After months of labouring over words, recipes and even photographs the moment arrived when my book was complete and it was time to send it for publication. The Pleasure of Preserving was very much a labour of love because with two young children in tow at times it was a slow going process, but also my young daughters were very much involved in the process from their help with hedgerow picking, to testing and tasting recipes and of course they were in many of the photographs.  It was never a commercial venture and I wasn’t planning on retiring to Monaco on the royalties, but I was very much looking forward to holding the book in my hand and to posting it out to willing readers.

With the printers paid and my manuscript complete I was promised the book within a fortnight and began my marketing with reviews appearing in a few magazines and orders beginning to trickle in. Then on the day I expected to take delivery of my books, I received another invoice for more than the whole of the original quote (which was paid up front), this was a somewhat unexpected and unwanted surprise and after a few phone calls, I concluded that this was not a simple computer generated error. I felt very much held to ransom and this was not a nice position to be in. The printing company called me and said that the books were ready for dispatch and did I want to pay the additional £1,600 or have the books destroyed, I already had a financial investment in the books and I also had an emotional investment in the book, so of course I didn’t want them destroyed, but nor could I fathom the additional charges.

136To allow me time to sort out the issue of the invoice I had to cancel any orders I had received and remove it from Amazon.  I was deeply saddened by the whole scenario and offer sincere apologies to anyone disappointed by their inability to get hold of a copy. Despite promises from the printers the matter remained unresolved for many months. However, finally the mystery case of the printers is solved and is satisfactorily resolved. I must admit that this little saga has taken the shine of the whole process, but my second book on Wartime Preserving has now gone to print (with a different printers), so that is something to look forward to.

I have embraced technology and The Pleasure of Preserving is currently available on Kindle and the printed version will be made available following its joint book launch with Wartime Preserving from 30th May 2015.

My book Wartime Preserving has been a delight to write and I certainly learnt some valuable lessons from my first publishing experience. I really look forward to sharing future books with you all and perhaps I’ll write one on the pitfalls of publishing.

If you fancy reading a kindle version of The Pleasure of Preserving you can download it from http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00UFXC8LQ

 

 

 

 

 

About Seren Charrington-Hollins

ABOUT SEREN-CHARRINGTON-HOLLINS Describing my work through just one job title is difficult; because my professional life sees me wear a few hats: Food Historian, period cook, broadcaster, writer and consultant. I have a great passion for social and food history and in addition to researching food history and trends I have also acted as a consultant on domestic life and changes throughout history for a number of International Companies. In addition to being regularly aired on radio stations; I have made a number of television appearances on everything from Sky News through to ITV’s Country House Sunday, Holiday of a Lifetime with Len Goodman , BBC4’s Castle’s Under Siege, BBC South Ration Book Britain; Pubs that Built Britain with Hairy Bikers and BBC 2’s Inside the Factory. Amongst other publications my work has been featured in Period Living Magazine, Telegraph, Daily Telegraph, Daily Mail and Great British Food Magazine and I write regularly for a variety of print and online publications. I am very fortunate to be able to undertake work that is also my passion and never tire of researching; recreating historical recipes and researching changing domestic patterns. Feel free to visit my blog, www.serenitykitchen.com