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As I sit here writing my weekly wittering’s I must confess I am feeling somewhat tired from a rather swell evening watching Jeeves and Wooster stage show at Theatre Seven. In the lead up to attending the performance I was jolly excited and my dear friend, Nancy and I decided to enter into the spirit of the show by wearing period costumes and I even made ostrich plumed headbands for us to wear.

Set in the 1930s P.G. Wodehouse’s ‘Jeeves’ stories in addition to the radio and television series based on the former are riddled with charming English phrases and I must admit that for me this is part of the charm of the tales for me. Dressed in period attire and looking rather fine and dandy, Nancy and I adopted the diction of Jeeves and Wooster and fully embraced the spirit of the theatre.

As we took our seats and the curtains went up I felt all of a twitter as I hoped that the stage show would live up to my expectations , but it turns out that I didn’t need to worry for by Jove, Robert Webb, Christopher Ryan and Jason Thorpe, put on a simply spiffing performance. These three brilliant actors treated us to a wonderfully entertaining evening in the company of Jeeves, Wooster, Gussie Fink-Nottle, Madeline Bassett, Sir Watkin Bassett, Dahlia Travers, Roderick Spode and Constable Oates. They all gave positively ripping performances and I haven’t laughed so hard in years.

DSCF1109 (Small)In the course of the stage show the character of Bertie Wooster tells the bumbling tale of when a country house weekend takes a turn for the worse and he is unwittingly called on to play matchmaker and simultaneously instructed to also steal a silver cow creamer from Totleigh Towers. Naturally, the ever dependable Jeeves is there to prevent Bertie from making a complete fool of his self, but not before an array of confusing, engrossing and amusing activities have taken place.

The performance was memorably finished off by all three actors giving an admirably energetic demonstration of the Charleston Dance and I must confess I really want to learn the Charleston , even when not wearing my period attire.

After the performance we decided to round up the evening by indulging in a few glasses of Prosecco after which we were feeling a little tipsy or as Wooster would say we were, tight as an owl. It was a positively lovely evening and one that I will treasure the memories of.   I am most tempted to catch another performance, but then I have always been a huge fan of Jeeves and Wooster.

Well until next week, Toodle-Pip from West Wales.

Seren

 

Ps. If you want to find out more about the show visit http://www.jeevesandwoosterplay.com

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About Seren Charrington-Hollins

ABOUT SEREN-CHARRINGTON-HOLLINS Describing my work through just one job title is difficult; because my professional life sees me wear a few hats: Food Historian, period cook, broadcaster, writer and consultant. I have a great passion for social and food history and in addition to researching food history and trends I have also acted as a consultant on domestic life and changes throughout history for a number of International Companies. In addition to being regularly aired on radio stations; I have made a number of television appearances on everything from Sky News through to ITV’s Country House Sunday, Holiday of a Lifetime with Len Goodman , BBC4’s Castle’s Under Siege, BBC South Ration Book Britain; Pubs that Built Britain with Hairy Bikers and BBC 2’s Inside the Factory. Amongst other publications my work has been featured in Period Living Magazine, Telegraph, Daily Telegraph, Daily Mail and Great British Food Magazine and I write regularly for a variety of print and online publications. I am very fortunate to be able to undertake work that is also my passion and never tire of researching; recreating historical recipes and researching changing domestic patterns. Feel free to visit my blog, www.serenitykitchen.com