ww16-1The glorious sunshine has encouraged the gardening effort and I have now replanted the vegetable patch following the sheep incident. With leeks, cabbages, carrots, beetroot, kale, onions, squash, aubergine and courgettes planted it is not a surprise that I caught the sun on my back and that my legs are aching. With a good proportion of the hard work done I couldn’t resist a bit of gardening fun in the sun and decided to make myself some garden helpers in the form of my lady scarecrows. The girls really enjoyed making these and Hattie now wants a scare-dog, so who knows what creative endeavours will ensue this week.
The bantams, chickens and turkeys arrive later this week so I will be busily getting the poultry pens finished off and ensuring that Mr. Fox can’t pay my feathered friends any after hour visits. I was only planning on a few chickens, but I ended up agreeing a deal for fourteen bantams, three turkeys and four chickens. They will certainly breathe some life into the garden and I look forward to collecting the eggs every morning with Hattie and Libby. However, before I get carried away dreaming of making meringues and trying recipes using turkey eggs I will have to give all my coops a fresh lick of paint and a good clean, oh the glamour of keeping animals.
ww16-2The rhubarb in the far corner of the garden has gone berserk and whilst there are only so many rhubarb pies you can eat, I am now making rhubarb champagne to a recipe found in my trusty 1940’s wine making guide. Well it just goes to show that opulence can even be found in the back garden.
With all this fine weather I have found myself indulging in all things outdoors, but today will see me back in the kitchen as I catch up on some much missed baking and as I whisk up my sponge cakes I shall reflect on the fact that next week I’ll be able to use turkey eggs in my baked delights. Turkey egg experts reliably tell me that whilst uncommon in supermarkets that the eggs are not only richer than a hen’s egg, but delicious fried, poached or boiled. Well it seems that I shall have to look for some large egg cups and supersize those toast soldiers.
Whilst the sun shines I will be enjoying the delights of being at home and hopefully I will catch up on my writing work and no doubt there will be animal and children antics as I attempt to get the home work balance or at least survive the working from home chaos. However, all work plans will have to go on hold for an hour or two as I have promised the girls that we will make an insect hotel in the garden for the solitary bees and creepy crawlies to enjoy. I just hope we attract a good calibre of guest and that they leave positive reviews on trip advisor.
Well until next time a fond farewell from West Wales.
Seren

About Seren Charrington-Hollins

ABOUT SEREN-CHARRINGTON-HOLLINS Describing my work through just one job title is difficult; because my professional life sees me wear a few hats: Food Historian, period cook, broadcaster, writer and consultant. I have a great passion for social and food history and in addition to researching food history and trends I have also acted as a consultant on domestic life and changes throughout history for a number of International Companies. In addition to being regularly aired on radio stations; I have made a number of television appearances on everything from Sky News through to ITV’s Country House Sunday, Holiday of a Lifetime with Len Goodman , BBC4’s Castle’s Under Siege, BBC South Ration Book Britain; Pubs that Built Britain with Hairy Bikers and BBC 2’s Inside the Factory. Amongst other publications my work has been featured in Period Living Magazine, Telegraph, Daily Telegraph, Daily Mail and Great British Food Magazine and I write regularly for a variety of print and online publications. I am very fortunate to be able to undertake work that is also my passion and never tire of researching; recreating historical recipes and researching changing domestic patterns. Feel free to visit my blog, www.serenitykitchen.com