ww15-1This week has signaled a new arrival in the form of Miss Mollie, a two year old rescue dog who has made herself well and truly at home.  She is a gentle giant and has become best friends with the girls as well as a much needed play mate for Bramble.  She didn’t look quite so big at the kennels, but now she’s at home with me she is looking to be a similar size to my miniature Shetland pony, Dewdrop.

Dewdrop is now stabled with the birth of her foal anticipated in the next two weeks. I have the birthing kit ready and I really do feel like something out of Call the Midwife. I am incredibly excited about the imminent birth of a foal and can’t wait to see the new arrival for the first time. Mini foals range in size at birth from 12” to 20”, weighing anything from 12 to 20 lbs. There will be lots of photographs when the little one arrives.

ww15-4There was a minor setback on the gardening front when a gang of sheep broke into my vegetable plot on an early morning raid. They chomped and chewed their way through the young vegetable plants and they pre-seasoned themselves by eating four large mint plants. I have now blocked up the gap in the fence that they made and have invested in some netting to try and prevent the woolly vandals from having another feast in my garden.

After a big clear out this week I found a lot of old shoes and boots that haven’t been worn for years for the usual, too worn, too big, too small, too uncomfortable sort of reasons. I gave the best of the bunch to a local charity shop and was left with the oddments, as  I really hate to throw things away I decided to up-cycle the remaining motley shoes into containers for my geranium and pansy plants. ww15-2This was a simple exercise and just involved making a few holes in soles before planting them up with my chosen flowers. I think they are great and my girls had great fun helping to do this.

Last week I also took a walk in the steps of Patrick McGoohan as I visited Portmeirion, in North Wales, the fantastical village where most of the exteriors for the cult classic, ‘The Prisoner’, were filmed. ww15-3It was wonderful to walk around the setting for the mysterious ‘Village’ in which Patrick McGoohan’s character Number Six was incarcerated and to deliberate over the questions that the series posed such as, who was running The Village or even why Number Six was there in the first place. Then of course there are questions about the very essence of the series, was ‘The Prisoner’ a story with a hidden meaning or a comment on life, furthermore was it science fiction or was it just a fast paced action adventure? There were always more questions than there were answers and all I can say is, ‘’ don’t ask me – that would be telling!’’

Until Next Week I bid you a fond farewell from West Wales
Seren

About Seren Charrington-Hollins

ABOUT SEREN-CHARRINGTON-HOLLINS Describing my work through just one job title is difficult; because my professional life sees me wear a few hats: Food Historian, period cook, broadcaster, writer and consultant. I have a great passion for social and food history and in addition to researching food history and trends I have also acted as a consultant on domestic life and changes throughout history for a number of International Companies. In addition to being regularly aired on radio stations; I have made a number of television appearances on everything from Sky News through to ITV’s Country House Sunday, Holiday of a Lifetime with Len Goodman , BBC4’s Castle’s Under Siege, BBC South Ration Book Britain; Pubs that Built Britain with Hairy Bikers and BBC 2’s Inside the Factory. Amongst other publications my work has been featured in Period Living Magazine, Telegraph, Daily Telegraph, Daily Mail and Great British Food Magazine and I write regularly for a variety of print and online publications. I am very fortunate to be able to undertake work that is also my passion and never tire of researching; recreating historical recipes and researching changing domestic patterns. Feel free to visit my blog, www.serenitykitchen.com